Dissertation (complete)

The dissertation is a 40 credit course (60 credit in the case of Occupational Safety and Health/ Occupational Hygiene), accounting for a significant component of the overall marks for the Masters degree classification.  As a double unit, the learning time associated with the dissertation is approximately 400 hours.  This encompasses all activities associated with the research i.e. literature searching and evaluation, 'practical' analysis of results and writing up.  It is regarded by the University and the External Examiners as the most definitive piece of work produced by a student, and a strong indicator of a student's academic ability.  Of particular importance the research project is seen as the critical indicator of attainment of Masters level as distinct from the Post Graduate Diploma.

It is important that the dissertation is properly and full referenced, to avoid any problems arising with plagiarism.  Close links with your tutor should enable you to develop your ideas clearly, and express them in an appropriate way.  A good working relationship with your tutor is probably the best way of ensuring bona fide research of a satisfactory quality.

Producing your dissertation is not an open-ended task.  Between the start of your research, and the deadline for submission, there are a number of tasks that need to be undertaken in sequence.  Your management of this process is an essential part of undertaking the unit.  The tasks to be undertaken depend upon the methodology you have devised for your dissertation (see 4.4).

Having identified the tasks, each can be programmed and undertaken in sequence.  This facilitates good time management.  A simple Gantt chart is a useful tool.  A typical Gantt Chart is shown in Figure 1.  The duration (time) is shown across the top and the tasks down the left hand side.  The aim is stated at the top to ensure the approach is focused.  For each task the top line shows the projected time span, the lower line the actual time span/progress.  It should be drawn up working back from the submission date.  Each task in the methodology becomes an activity on the Gantt chart.  There will be additional activities to be included, such as writing-up, reading over, editing, making corrections, critical reading, printing and binding etc.  Ideally few, if any, of these tasks should be overlapped because there is only one resource available - you.  However, time constraints may mean overlap is necessary e.g. researching the introduction whilst sending out questionnaires.

There are various approaches to undertaking a dissertation.  Students should select the one that best suits their own style of working.  An approach that we recommend and which produces good results is to treat each of the tasks as a separate assignment.  Identify from the Gantt chart the time available to complete the task and then undertake only that task.  This allows you to concentrate on a single task, which should help you to produce the best possible result.  If you attempt to undertake a number of tasks at the same time, you may dilute your efforts and consequently not produce the best possible work for each task.  However, such an approach may not always be totally practicable.  Upon completion of a task move onto the next task in turn.  Whilst undertaking a task you will inevitably come across information and data that is relevant to other tasks.  The reference for the data or information should be made and stored in the file for that task. 

 

The dissertation is a 40 credit course (60 credit in the case of Occupational Safety and Health/ Occupational Hygiene), accounting for a significant component of the overall marks for the Masters degree classification.  As a double unit, the learning time associated with the dissertation is approximately 400 hours.  This encompasses all activities associated with the research i.e. literature searching and evaluation, ‘practical’ analysis of results and writing up.  It is regarded by the University and the External Examiners as the most definitive piece of work produced by a student, and a strong indicator of a student’s academic ability.  Of particular importance the research project is seen as the critical indicator of attainment of Masters level as distinct from the Post Graduate Diploma.

It is important that the dissertation is properly and full referenced, to avoid any problems arising with plagiarism.  Close links with your tutor should enable you to develop your ideas clearly, and express them in an appropriate way.  A good working relationship with your tutor is probably the best way of ensuring bona fide research of a satisfactory quality.

Producing your dissertation is not an open-ended task.  Between the start of your research, and the deadline for submission, there are a number of tasks that need to be undertaken in sequence.  Your management of this process is an essential part of undertaking the unit.  The tasks to be undertaken depend upon the methodology you have devised for your dissertation (see 4.4).

Having identified the tasks, each can be programmed and undertaken in sequence.  This facilitates good time management.  A simple Gantt chart is a useful tool.  A typical Gantt Chart is shown in Figure 1.  The duration (time) is shown across the top and the tasks down the left hand side.  The aim is stated at the top to ensure the approach is focused.  For each task the top line shows the projected time span, the lower line the actual time span/progress.  It should be drawn up working back from the submission date.  Each task in the methodology becomes an activity on the Gantt chart.  There will be additional activities to be included, such as writing-up, reading over, editing, making corrections, critical reading, printing and binding etc.  Ideally few, if any, of these tasks should be overlapped because there is only one resource available - you.  However, time constraints may mean overlap is necessary e.g. researching the introduction whilst sending out questionnaires.

There are various approaches to undertaking a dissertation.  Students should select the one that best suits their own style of working.  An approach that we recommend and which produces good results is to treat each of the tasks as a separate assignment.  Identify from the Gantt chart the time available to complete the task and then undertake only that task.  This allows you to concentrate on a single task, which should help you to produce the best possible result.  If you attempt to undertake a number of tasks at the same time, you may dilute your efforts and consequently not produce the best possible work for each task.  However, such an approach may not always be totally practicable.  Upon completion of a task move onto the next task in turn.  Whilst undertaking a task you will inevitably come across information and data that is relevant to other tasks.  The reference for the data or information should be made and stored in the file for that task.  Alternatively you may be able

Contact Hours

This course is offered in 0 hours


This course is accessible through:-

Safety, Health, Environment & Occupational Hygiene Programme


This programme is ideal if you aspire to or are currently working as a health and safety professional. Taught by leading experts in the industry together with our fresh approach to teaching, you will learn and develop innovative approaches when managing health and safety issues.

Click for more information